Holi-yay

I’ve come back to the not-so-sunny-now Spanish coast for a few days right before Christmas, because it is my birthday and because the flight was way cheaper.

It is only a couple of hours in between the two countries, but I have decided to take some books with me, and, of course, bring some back with me as well.

My pick for the plane will not surprise anyone as I already mentioned this on my New Purchases blogpost: The lovely Franzen and his How To Be Alone. I really want to start this one, and I just thought it would be an easy reading for the waiting in the airport and the uncomfortable Ryanair seats, and a relief after The Vegetarian –and you will understand why soon. I will also bring some beloved books that I will have to abandon there, as the lack of space is starting to be an issue. Atonement and Pygmy among others, besides a HUGE AND GEORGEOUS compilation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novels, praying for my suitcase to be within the weight limits.

From my old room I will bring some books I left behind when I moved to London. I will get back to Freedom by Franzen (I am repeating myself, I am not sorry), as I never finished it and I would like to do so before getting into Purity. I also have a feeling that I will bring some Classics with me as I am weak and I love a classic novel in winter time, but that will highly depend on the space I have left after I pack my suitcase with all sorts of Spanish goods.

I am excited to put on a real Christmas tree, and eat as much as I can,  avoiding the fact that I will be one year older when I come back, but that is not such a bad thing as I am still here after all. Read you soon.

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Book Review: Bark, by Lorrie Moore

3170385-9788845279096I love compilations of short stories. There is something really intense about them, a fixed moment on a bigger story, a memory, filling up the gaps with your own conclusions, and Lorrie Moore has proved to be pretty amazing at them.

The basis of the stories put together in Bark are nothing you could ever expect. You get easily trapped in them from the start, and when they come to an end you just want to know the rest of the story, where those characters come from and what happens next in their lives.It feels like finishing a meal whilst thinking what you are going to have for dessert.

I will also dare to say that the combination of the stories’ themes and the way they are written is close to perfection. Somehow Lorrie Moore has managed to transmit the characters’ feelings and thoughts through their actions, something that is already hard enough to achieve in novels, and this is another reason why I am so impressed by this work.

“At this my heart sickened and plummeted down my left side and into my shoe. My appetite, too, shrank to a small pebble and sat in stony reserve in the place my heart had been and to which my heart would at some point return, but not in time for dessert.”

To be fair, she is basically good with words. The combination of words is outstanding, and she does not fall in the routine of using literary jargon just for the sake of it, the words are simple and pure, and so the message gets transmitted smoothly, and, of course, she does not forget about giving the stories a touch of irony and humour as well.

“You could lose someone a little but they would still roam the earth. The end of love was one big zombie movie.”

“The plastic panel where the number should show was clouded as if by a scrim, a page of onionskin over the onion – or rather, over a picture of an onion. One depiction on top of another.”

The stories are intense and touching, easy to read but nonetheless perfectly put together. A book anyone would enjoy and no one would regret reading.